Traditional writing desks

Through the "tech boom" of the s, office worker numbers increased along with the cost of office space rent.

However, the size of displays often increased to accommodate multiple on-screen windows, to display more and more information simultaneously. Traditional writing desks the late s, desks remained a place for paperwork and "business machines", but the personal computer was taking hold in large and medium-sized businesses.

The basic desk forms were developed mostly in the 17th and 18th centuries. School desk manufactured by the American S. Before this, most students in America sat either on chairs or long benches at long tables.

Even computer monitor bezels themselves were used to attach reminder notes and business cards. This was the first sharp division in desk manufacturing. Anna Breadin designed and patented a one-piece school desk in the late s that was built with a table section attached in front of a wooden seat and back rest.

The cubicle desk became widely accepted in North America as an economical way of squeezing more desk workers into the same space, without further shrinking the size of their cramped working surfaces. New office suites included a "knee hole" credenza which was a place for a terminal or personal computer and keyboard tray.

The need for more space led some desk companies to attach some accessory items to the modesty panel at the back of the desk, such as outlet strips and cable managementin an attempt to clear the desktop of electrical clutter.

However, the Traditional writing desks of printing personal documents and the lack of comfort with reading text on computer monitors led to a great deal of document printing.

Company of Buffalo, New York in about Student desk and chair commonly used in high schools and universities. Soon, new office designs also included "U-shape" suites which added a bridge worksurface between the back credenza and front desk.

The desks are usually mass-produced in steel or wood and sold on the consumer market. The lighter weight and slimmer profile of the new displays allowed them to be mounted on flexible arms, so they could be swung into view or out of the way, and adjusted frequently as needed.

With computers more prevalent, "computer paper" became an office supply. More paper and correspondence drove the need for more complex desks and more specialized desks, such as the rolltop desk which was a mass-produced, slatted variant of the classical cylinder desk.

Early in the s, private office workers found that their side and back computer-placing furniture made it hard to show the contents of a computer screen to guests or co-workers. The desks were designed with slots and hooks for bookmarks and for writing implements.

Refinements to the first desk forms were considerable through the 19th century, as steam-driven machinery made cheap wood-pulp paper possible towards the end of the first phase of the Industrial Revolution.

Modern mass-produced student desks are often made with laminate table tops and molded plastic seats in a combined single unit, with storage found under the desktop or on a wire shelf beneath the seat.

These desks are not as tall as normal adult desks. The modern ergonomic desk is a refinement of the mechanically complex drawing table or drafting table [9] from the end of the 18th century.

A student desk can be any desk form meant for use by an enrollee in elementary, secondary or postsecondary education. As these office workers grew in number, desks were mass-produced for them in large quantities, using newer, steam-driven woodworking machinery.

This also gave rise to the " typewriter desk ", a platform, sometimes on wheels and with expandable surface via flaps, that was built to a specific height to make typing easier and more comfortable than when using a standard or traditional desk.

This forward computer monitor placement promotes a clearer sight-line to greet colleagues and allows for common viewing of information displayed on a screen.

Steel desks were introduced to take heavier loads of paper and withstand the pounding meted out on the typewriters. Even executive or management desks became mass-produced, built of cheap plywood or fiberboard covered with wood finish, as the number of people managing the white collar workers became even greater.

The beginning of this paper boom gave birth to the dream of the " paperless office ", in which all information would only appear on computer monitors.

Before the invention of the movable type printing press in the 15th century, any reader was potentially a writer or publisher or both, since any book or other document had to be copied by hand. Correspondence and other documents were now too numerous to get enough attention to be rolled up or folded again, then summarized and tagged before being pigeonholed in a small compartment over or under the work surface of the desk.

Steel versions[ edit ] A small boom in office work and desk production occurred at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th with the introduction of smaller and less expensive electrical presses[ further explanation needed ] and efficient carbon paper coupled with the general acceptance of the typewriter.

Thus, age alone does not guarantee that an antique desk is a masterpiece, since this split in quality took place more than a hundred years ago. Industrial era[ edit ] An office desk in a cubicle, which shows the sharing of space between computer components and paper documents.

Since manuscript volumes were sometimes large and heavy, desks of the period usually had massive structures. The need for paperwork space vied with the increased desk space taken up by computer monitors, computers, printers, scanners, and other peripherals.

Manufacturers have responded to this issue by creating "forward facing" desks where computer monitors are placed on the front of the "U-shape" workstation.

This necessitated a more central placement of the computer on these "U-shape" suite desk systems. Paper documents became voluminous enough to be stored separately in filing cabinets.IKEA - KNOTTEN, Standing desk, This standing desk is a modern version of a traditional writing desk.

The desk is ideal as the information hub of the home. A desk or bureau is a piece of furniture with a flat table-style work surface used in a school, office, home or the like for academic, professional or domestic activities such as reading, writing, or using equipment such as a computer.

Desks often have one or more drawers, compartments, or pigeonholes to store items such as office supplies and .

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Traditional writing desks
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